Copyright © 2016 by Avlis Productions Inc.
Silva Courses From the mind of José Silva
“So that when we move on, we shall have left behind a better world”
Benefits of Intuition
/SilvaCourses
Claim your creative heritage Jose Silva was a very creative individual, to say the least. It was his ability to "think outside the box" that allowed him to do things that no one had ever done before. He says there are two kinds of creativity: 1. Rearranging what already exists into a new form 2. Bringing something brand new to the planet Both techniques spring from the alpha level. If you want the second kind, it obviously requires clairvoyance. Great creative people are able to project their minds to other dimensions, and express what they find there. Great classical music is an example of this. That's why it affects people so deeply...it is communication from another dimension. People who have never cared for classical music often find that when they listen to it while at their level, it bring them great enjoyment. Great literature that inspires us does so because the author is bring us something from another dimension, which enables us to learn something new about ourselves. Art teacher Dord Fitz, who organized Jose Silva’s first public Silva Mind Control course, used to tell his students, “You cannot be a great artist unless you are a great clairvoyant.” Painting, dance...in fact, every kind of creative expression can achieve a similar effect. Tips from a Writer Ed Bernd Jr. grew up in the newspaper business and describes himself as a reporter with many years of experience as both a news photographer, when he was young, and more than ten years as a staff writer for metropolitan daily newspapers. He is also an author...he coauthored Jose Silva's last four books; a Silva lecturer since 1977, and a producer... he has produced numerous multi-image shows for the Silva International Conventions, as well as several Silva audio and video home study courses. He is an excellent poet too. Here are some of his tips, starting with general suggestions that apply to all forms of creativity: *Think it through at alpha; alpha is the ideal level for thinking...the creative level. *Dreams work wonders...just ask Robert Louis Stevenson. You can program yourself, at the alpha level, to remember your dreams, and to have dreams that will help you express your creativity. *Bring a mentor to your level to advise you. Bring in any expert...at your level, imagine asking your favorite author (or photographer, or lecturer, or producer) how he or she would handle the situation, how they would solve the problem. Then clear your mind for a moment by thinking of another subject, and after a few moments, start thinking again to figure out what the person would answer to you. The ideas that come are from the expert, the person you admire. Try them out...you might be surprised at how well they work. *Learn form those you admire, but always, always be yourself. A copy is never as good as the original, and you cannot be anything or anyone but yourself. You can stand on the shoulders of those who came before, people you admire. Always remember though that you have something unique to give the world, so use your level and the Silva techniques to help you determine what it is, and give it to the world. *Your body radiates energy, and this energy is stored in matter that is within range of your aura. That is one reason why an entertainer like Willie Nelson continues to use a battered old guitar that has had an extra hole worn in it from so much use. If you find yourself getting more creative ideas in a certain room, while relaxing in a particular chair, while using a certain computer or paintbrush or camera, then keep using it. There is probably a record of your successes stored within the object. You can learn more about "psychometry" in Jose Silva's UltraMind ESP System. *You can definitely be inspired to do better work by other creative people. Listening to great classical music, reading great literature, studying great art, and enjoying a great performance can all be very inspiring and elevate the quality of your work. Imagine how much more help it is to surround yourself with other creative people. Not only will you communicate with the words you speak to one another, your minds will also communicate with each other's minds, even if you are not consciously aware of it. *If somebody explains it all to you, tells you why they used this technique or that technique, why they selected certain words or colors or whatever...be suspicious. Language and rationality and logic are left brain functions; creativity is a right brain function. When you ask a creative person why they did something the way they did, they may just shrug and say, "I don't know." Here are some techniques that Ed has developed while writing more than 10 million words for publication...think about them at your level: "If you have having trouble getting started - and I suspect that we all do from time to time - then just write anything. You will probably find the correct 'lead' in the third or fourth sentence. 'County Commissioners voted today to.... (what did they do?)... purchase three airplanes to use to spray for mosquitoes....' Now you are getting to the main point: 'There will be a new weapon in the war against mosquitoes this summer...' Now you are writing something that people are interested in. Better yet, find one word or phrase to start with: 'Mosquito control...' This works for every kind of writing. If you don't get an idea to reveal itself while you are at your level, then start writing...when your mind realizes how serious you are, it will go ahead and serve up the idea. "Stress and pressure block creative ideas. That's one reason the previous technique works. Sometimes simply telling someone that you don't have time to come up with a new idea will take the pressure off, and next thing you know, you've come up with the idea you need. "When writing, always stop when you know what comes next. That makes it extremely easy to get started again, and once you are started, it is easy to continue. When I was working for daily newspapers and writing a story on deadline, I would sometimes get a phone call with information I needed for another story. I learned it was much better to stop writing in the middle of a sentence. If I finished the sentence, I might not remember what I was going to write next. But if I stopped in the middle of a sentence, I could always figure out what came next, and the momentum would carry me right into the next sentence. I use the same technique when writing books. Always stop when you know what comes next. "Keep it simple. If you are having trouble getting a long sentence to sound right, break it up into two or more simple sentences. Keep it simple. "Read what you wrote out loud. If you cannot read it out loud easily, then rewrite it. "When editing, cut out everything - every word - that is not essential. This makes copy easier to read."
Creativity with a camera       Ed's parents sent out a Christmas card at Christmas of 1940 with a picture of him looking through the back of a Speed Graphic press camera when he was just six weeks old. At the age of 18, he was a good enough news photographer to be offered a job as a staff photographer for the Atlanta (Georgia) Journal and Constitution. He suggests: "Cameras take photographs; photographers make pictures. Use your creative abilities to make pictures. Relax and let your creative energies offer you suggestions. "Watch the background. It can make your photo great, or ruin what might have been a good photo. That's one of the big differences between amateurs and professionals...the pros are always aware of what's in the background. Program yourself at your level to always remember to check the background. "If you use a zoom lens, never zoom just for convenience. Select your perspective first, then zoom to the correct focal length to give you the perspective you want. "It takes light to make an exposure on film. The quality and direction of light is the most important element you are working with. If the light is behind you, people look like cardboard cutouts. If the light is towards one side or the other, this will add depth to your picture. When looking at your photos, take time to go to level and ask yourself if they could have been improved by a different perspective, different lighting, etc." Here are some tips for lecturers: "Meet as many members of the audience as possible before you start. Talk with them, find out what they are interested in. It is much easier to get up and chat with friends than to have to lecture to strangers. "Mental Rehearsal is great. Go to your alpha level and lecture to an imaginary audience. When you do this at your level, this is almost as valuable as doing it in front of a live audience. "Always level with your audience...tell them the truth. The great broadcaster Larry King said that when he finally got his first opportunity to be on the radio, he was terrified. The station manager had told him to use the name Larry King instead of his real name. Nobody was there to help him. Although he had wanted this opportunity, it was very intimidating. What was the first thing he did when he turned on the microphone? He told the audience that this was his first broadcast ever, that he had just gotten a new name, that he was nervous, but that he wanted to be of service to his audience, and if they would bear with him, and let him know what they wanted, he would do his best. Trying to fool people will just make you more nervous, so go ahead and level with them. "Remember that whatever you are talking about is not for your benefit...it is for the audience's benefit. If you concentrate on trying to give a 'perfect' performance, this puts a tremendous amount of pressure on you. If you look at audience members and mentally ask yourself what they need to hear from you, then you will do just fine. "If you forget what you were going to say next, just ask if anyone has a question. Somebody will probably ask you about the very thing you were going to cover next. "It is easy to know what to do: Whatever the audience responds favorably to, keep doing it, and do more of it. Trial and error is a great way to continue to get better and better. People can only sit still for a certain length of time; when they start getting up and leaving, it is time to take a break. "Study great presenters and entertainers. Notice how they get an audience involved, how they get people's attention, how they evoke emotion in audience members. Then, at your level, use what you observe them doing to help you build on your own strengths and unique talents to continue to get better and better. "Timing is your most valuable tool. What is timing? Timing is made up of pauses. Timing is not doing something at the right time, as most people think. Timing is not doing something...until the right time. Every successful professional wrestler knows that when you perform a great move - body slam your opponent or whatever - you have to strut around the ring for a few moments in order to give the audience time to absorb and appreciate what you just did. It might be good wrestling to do several things to your opponent and then try to pin him, but it's not good showmanship. Watch them yourself...when you see wrestlers perform several moves one right after the other in rapid succession, how much to you recall of what they did? It takes time...there must be pauses in order for people to absorb what you want them to absorb. Listen to singers, how they often sing lyrics after the musical beats, not on the beat. By the way, have you ever noticed that the most successful professional wrestlers may not be the most skillful wrestlers, but they are definitely the most creative? Art instructor Dord Fitz, who worked with a lot of Coach Bear Bryant's football players at the University of Alabama, and said that the best athletes were almost always very creative people. "Always remember to analyze your own performance at your level. Also analyze the performances of other people at your level, so that you can gain more insight into what they do and why they do it, and what effect their actions have on the audience. Then see what you can do to improve your own performance, and become even better and better.
Continue reading and see how Juan Silva used the Silva techniques to help him become a successful inventor on the next page: Creating an Inventor
Ed Bernd Jr. and Jose Silva with some of their books
Copyright © 2016 by Avlis Productions Inc.
Silva Courses From the mind of José Silva
“To leave behind a better world”
Benefits of Intuition
/SilvaCourses
Continue reading and see how Juan Silva used the Silva techniques to help him become a successful inventor on the next page: Creating an Inventor
Creativity with a camera       Ed's parents sent out a Christmas card at Christmas of 1940 with a picture of him looking through the back of a Speed Graphic press camera when he was just six weeks old. At the age of 18, he was a good enough news photographer to be offered a job as a staff photographer for the Atlanta (Georgia) Journal and Constitution. He suggests: "Cameras take photographs; photographers make pictures. Use your creative abilities to make pictures. Relax and let your creative energies offer you suggestions. "Watch the background. It can make your photo great, or ruin what might have been a good photo. That's one of the big differences between amateurs and professionals...the pros are always aware of what's in the background. Program yourself at your level to always remember to check the background. "If you use a zoom lens, never zoom just for convenience. Select your perspective first, then zoom to the correct focal length to give you the perspective you want. "It takes light to make an exposure on film. The quality and direction of light is the most important element you are working with. If the light is behind you, people look like cardboard cutouts. If the light is towards one side or the other, this will add depth to your picture. When looking at your photos, take time to go to level and ask yourself if they could have been improved by a different perspective, different lighting, etc." Here are some tips for lecturers: "Meet as many members of the audience as possible before you start. Talk with them, find out what they are interested in. It is much easier to get up and chat with friends than to have to lecture to strangers. "Mental Rehearsal is great. Go to your alpha level and lecture to an imaginary audience. When you do this at your level, this is almost as valuable as doing it in front of a live audience. "Always level with your audience...tell them the truth. The great broadcaster Larry King said that when he finally got his first opportunity to be on the radio, he was terrified. The station manager had told him to use the name Larry King instead of his real name. Nobody was there to help him. Although he had wanted this opportunity, it was very intimidating. What was the first thing he did when he turned on the microphone? He told the audience that this was his first broadcast ever, that he had just gotten a new name, that he was nervous, but that he wanted to be of service to his audience, and if they would bear with him, and let him know what they wanted, he would do his best. Trying to fool people will just make you more nervous, so go ahead and level with them. "Remember that whatever you are talking about is not for your benefit...it is for the audience's benefit. If you concentrate on trying to give a 'perfect' performance, this puts a tremendous amount of pressure on you. If you look at audience members and mentally ask yourself what they need to hear from you, then you will do just fine. "If you forget what you were going to say next, just ask if anyone has a question. Somebody will probably ask you about the very thing you were going to cover next. "It is easy to know what to do: Whatever the audience responds favorably to, keep doing it, and do more of it. Trial and error is a great way to continue to get better and better. People can only sit still for a certain length of time; when they start getting up and leaving, it is time to take a break. "Study great presenters and entertainers. Notice how they get an audience involved, how they get people's attention, how they evoke emotion in audience members. Then, at your level, use what you observe them doing to help you build on your own strengths and unique talents to continue to get better and better. "Timing is your most valuable tool. What is timing? Timing is made up of pauses. Timing is not doing something at the right time, as most people think. Timing is not doing something...until the right time. Every successful professional wrestler knows that when you perform a great move - body slam your opponent or whatever - you have to strut around the ring for a few moments in order to give the audience time to absorb and appreciate what you just did. It might be good wrestling to do several things to your opponent and then try to pin him, but it's not good showmanship. Watch them yourself...when you see wrestlers perform several moves one right after the other in rapid succession, how much to you recall of what they did? It takes time...there must be pauses in order for people to absorb what you want them to absorb. Listen to singers, how they often sing lyrics after the musical beats, not on the beat. By the way, have you ever noticed that the most successful professional wrestlers may not be the most skillful wrestlers, but they are definitely the most creative? Art instructor Dord Fitz, who worked with a lot of Coach Bear Bryant's football players at the University of Alabama, and said that the best athletes were almost always very creative people. "Always remember to analyze your own performance at your level. Also analyze the performances of other people at your level, so that you can gain more insight into what they do and why they do it, and what effect their actions have on the audience. Then see what you can do to improve your own performance, and become even better and better.
Claim your creative heritage Jose Silva was a very creative individual, to say the least. It was his ability to "think outside the box" that allowed him to do things that no one had ever done before. He says there are two kinds of creativity: 1. Rearranging what already exists into a new form 2. Bringing something brand new to the planet Both techniques spring from the alpha level. If you want the second kind, it obviously requires clairvoyance. Great creative people are able to project their minds to other dimensions, and express what they find there. Great classical music is an example of this. That's why it affects people so deeply...it is communication from another dimension. People who have never cared for classical music often find that when they listen to it while at their level, it bring them great enjoyment. Great literature that inspires us does so because the author is bring us something from another dimension, which enables us to learn something new about ourselves. Art teacher Dord Fitz, who organized Jose Silva’s first public Silva Mind Control course, used to tell his students, “You cannot be a great artist unless you are a great clairvoyant.” Painting, dance...in fact, every kind of creative expression can achieve a similar effect. Tips from a Writer Ed Bernd Jr. grew up in the newspaper business and describes himself as a reporter with many years of experience as both a news photographer, when he was young, and more than ten years as a staff writer for metropolitan daily newspapers. He is also an author...he coauthored Jose Silva's last four books; a Silva lecturer since 1977, and a producer... he has produced numerous multi-image shows for the Silva International Conventions, as well as several Silva audio and video home study courses. He is an excellent poet too. Here are some of his tips, starting with general suggestions that apply to all forms of creativity: *Think it through at alpha; alpha is the ideal level for thinking...the creative level. *Dreams work wonders...just ask Robert Louis Stevenson. You can program yourself, at the alpha level, to remember your dreams, and to have dreams that will help you express your creativity. *Bring a mentor to your level to advise you. Bring in any expert...at your level, imagine asking your favorite author (or photographer, or lecturer, or producer) how he or she would handle the situation, how they would solve the problem. Then clear your mind for a moment by thinking of another subject, and after a few moments, start thinking again to figure out what the person would answer to you. The ideas that come are from the expert, the person you admire. Try them out...you might be surprised at how well they work. *Learn form those you admire, but always, always be yourself. A copy is never as good as the original, and you cannot be anything or anyone but yourself. You can stand on the shoulders of those who came before, people you admire. Always remember though that you have something unique to give the world, so use your level and the Silva techniques to help you determine what it is, and give it to the world. *Your body radiates energy, and this energy is stored in matter that is within range of your aura. That is one reason why an entertainer like Willie Nelson continues to use a battered old guitar that has had an extra hole worn in it from so much use. If you find yourself getting more creative ideas in a certain room, while relaxing in a particular chair, while using a certain computer or paintbrush or camera, then keep using it. There is probably a record of your successes stored within the object. You can learn more about "psychometry" in Jose Silva's UltraMind ESP System. *You can definitely be inspired to do better work by other creative people. Listening to great classical music, reading great literature, studying great art, and enjoying a great performance can all be very inspiring and elevate the quality of your work. Imagine how much more help it is to surround yourself with other creative people. Not only will you communicate with the words you speak to one another, your minds will also communicate with each other's minds, even if you are not consciously aware of it. *If somebody explains it all to you, tells you why they used this technique or that technique, why they selected certain words or colors or whatever...be suspicious. Language and rationality and logic are left brain functions; creativity is a right brain function. When you ask a creative person why they did something the way they did, they may just shrug and say, "I don't know." Here are some techniques that Ed has developed while writing more than 10 million words for publication...think about them at your level: "If you have having trouble getting started - and I suspect that we all do from time to time - then just write anything. You will probably find the correct 'lead' in the third or fourth sentence. 'County Commissioners voted today to.... (what did they do?)... purchase three airplanes to use to spray for mosquitoes....' Now you are getting to the main point: 'There will be a new weapon in the war against mosquitoes this summer...' Now you are writing something that people are interested in. Better yet, find one word or phrase to start with: 'Mosquito control...' This works for every kind of writing. If you don't get an idea to reveal itself while you are at your level, then start writing...when your mind realizes how serious you are, it will go ahead and serve up the idea. "Stress and pressure block creative ideas. That's one reason the previous technique works. Sometimes simply telling someone that you don't have time to come up with a new idea will take the pressure off, and next thing you know, you've come up with the idea you need. "When writing, always stop when you know what comes next. That makes it extremely easy to get started again, and once you are started, it is easy to continue. When I was working for daily newspapers and writing a story on deadline, I would sometimes get a phone call with information I needed for another story. I learned it was much better to stop writing in the middle of a sentence. If I finished the sentence, I might not remember what I was going to write next. But if I stopped in the middle of a sentence, I could always figure out what came next, and the momentum would carry me right into the next sentence. I use the same technique when writing books. Always stop when you know what comes next. "Keep it simple. If you are having trouble getting a long sentence to sound right, break it up into two or more simple sentences. Keep it simple. "Read what you wrote out loud. If you cannot read it out loud easily, then rewrite it. "When editing, cut out everything - every word - that is not essential. This makes copy easier to read."
Ed Bernd Jr. and Jose Silva with some of their books
Copyright © 2016 by Avlis Productions Inc.
Silva Courses From the mind of José Silva
“So that when we move on, we shall have left behind a better world”
Benefits of Intuition
/SilvaCourses
Claim your creative heritage Jose Silva was a very creative individual, to say the least. It was his ability to "think outside the box" that allowed him to do things that no one had ever done before. He says there are two kinds of creativity: 1. Rearranging what already exists into a new form 2. Bringing something brand new to the planet Both techniques spring from the alpha level. If you want the second kind, it obviously requires clairvoyance. Great creative people are able to project their minds to other dimensions, and express what they find there. Great classical music is an example of this. That's why it affects people so deeply...it is communication from another dimension. People who have never cared for classical music often find that when they listen to it while at their level, it bring them great enjoyment. Great literature that inspires us does so because the author is bring us something from another dimension, which enables us to learn something new about ourselves. Art teacher Dord Fitz, who organized Jose Silva’s first public Silva Mind Control course, used to tell his students, “You cannot be a great artist unless you are a great clairvoyant.” Painting, dance...in fact, every kind of creative expression can achieve a similar effect. Tips from a Writer Ed Bernd Jr. grew up in the newspaper business and describes himself as a reporter with many years of experience as both a news photographer, when he was young, and more than ten years as a staff writer for metropolitan daily newspapers. He is also an author...he coauthored Jose Silva's last four books; a Silva lecturer since 1977, and a producer... he has produced numerous multi-image shows for the Silva International Conventions, as well as several Silva audio and video home study courses. He is an excellent poet too. Here are some of his tips, starting with general suggestions that apply to all forms of creativity: *Think it through at alpha; alpha is the ideal level for thinking...the creative level. *Dreams work wonders...just ask Robert Louis Stevenson. You can program yourself, at the alpha level, to remember your dreams, and to have dreams that will help you express your creativity. *Bring a mentor to your level to advise you. Bring in any expert...at your level, imagine asking your favorite author (or photographer, or lecturer, or producer) how he or she would handle the situation, how they would solve the problem. Then clear your mind for a moment by thinking of another subject, and after a few moments, start thinking again to figure out what the person would answer to you. The ideas that come are from the expert, the person you admire. Try them out...you might be surprised at how well they work. *Learn form those you admire, but always, always be yourself. A copy is never as good as the original, and you cannot be anything or anyone but yourself. You can stand on the shoulders of those who came before, people you admire. Always remember though that you have something unique to give the world, so use your level and the Silva techniques to help you determine what it is, and give it to the world. *Your body radiates energy, and this energy is stored in matter that is within range of your aura. That is one reason why an entertainer like Willie Nelson continues to use a battered old guitar that has had an extra hole worn in it from so much use. If you find yourself getting more creative ideas in a certain room, while relaxing in a particular chair, while using a certain computer or paintbrush or camera, then keep using it. There is probably a record of your successes stored within the object. You can learn more about "psychometry" in Jose Silva's UltraMind ESP System. *You can definitely be inspired to do better work by other creative people. Listening to great classical music, reading great literature, studying great art, and enjoying a great performance can all be very inspiring and elevate the quality of your work. Imagine how much more help it is to surround yourself with other creative people. Not only will you communicate with the words you speak to one another, your minds will also communicate with each other's minds, even if you are not consciously aware of it. *If somebody explains it all to you, tells you why they used this technique or that technique, why they selected certain words or colors or whatever...be suspicious. Language and rationality and logic are left brain functions; creativity is a right brain function. When you ask a creative person why they did something the way they did, they may just shrug and say, "I don't know." Here are some techniques that Ed has developed while writing more than 10 million words for publication...think about them at your level: "If you have having trouble getting started - and I suspect that we all do from time to time - then just write anything. You will probably find the correct 'lead' in the third or fourth sentence. 'County Commissioners voted today to.... (what did they do?)... purchase three airplanes to use to spray for mosquitoes....' Now you are getting to the main point: 'There will be a new weapon in the war against mosquitoes this summer...' Now you are writing something that people are interested in. Better yet, find one word or phrase to start with: 'Mosquito control...' This works for every kind of writing. If you don't get an idea to reveal itself while you are at your level, then start writing...when your mind realizes how serious you are, it will go ahead and serve up the idea. "Stress and pressure block creative ideas. That's one reason the previous technique works. Sometimes simply telling someone that you don't have time to come up with a new idea will take the pressure off, and next thing you know, you've come up with the idea you need. "When writing, always stop when you know what comes next. That makes it extremely easy to get started again, and once you are started, it is easy to continue. When I was working for daily newspapers and writing a story on deadline, I would sometimes get a phone call with information I needed for another story. I learned it was much better to stop writing in the middle of a sentence. If I finished the sentence, I might not remember what I was going to write next. But if I stopped in the middle of a sentence, I could always figure out what came next, and the momentum would carry me right into the next sentence. I use the same technique when writing books. Always stop when you know what comes next. "Keep it simple. If you are having trouble getting a long sentence to sound right, break it up into two or more simple sentences. Keep it simple. "Read what you wrote out loud. If you cannot read it out loud easily, then rewrite it. "When editing, cut out everything - every word - that is not essential. This makes copy easier to read."
Creativity with a camera       Ed's parents sent out a Christmas card at Christmas of 1940 with a picture of him looking through the back of a Speed Graphic press camera when he was just six weeks old. At the age of 18, he was a good enough news photographer to be offered a job as a staff photographer for the Atlanta (Georgia) Journal and Constitution. He suggests: "Cameras take photographs; photographers make pictures. Use your creative abilities to make pictures. Relax and let your creative energies offer you suggestions. "Watch the background. It can make your photo great, or ruin what might have been a good photo. That's one of the big differences between amateurs and professionals...the pros are always aware of what's in the background. Program yourself at your level to always remember to check the background. "If you use a zoom lens, never zoom just for convenience. Select your perspective first, then zoom to the correct focal length to give you the perspective you want. "It takes light to make an exposure on film. The quality and direction of light is the most important element you are working with. If the light is behind you, people look like cardboard cutouts. If the light is towards one side or the other, this will add depth to your picture. When looking at your photos, take time to go to level and ask yourself if they could have been improved by a different perspective, different lighting, etc." Here are some tips for lecturers: "Meet as many members of the audience as possible before you start. Talk with them, find out what they are interested in. It is much easier to get up and chat with friends than to have to lecture to strangers. "Mental Rehearsal is great. Go to your alpha level and lecture to an imaginary audience. When you do this at your level, this is almost as valuable as doing it in front of a live audience. "Always level with your audience...tell them the truth. The great broadcaster Larry King said that when he finally got his first opportunity to be on the radio, he was terrified. The station manager had told him to use the name Larry King instead of his real name. Nobody was there to help him. Although he had wanted this opportunity, it was very intimidating. What was the first thing he did when he turned on the microphone? He told the audience that this was his first broadcast ever, that he had just gotten a new name, that he was nervous, but that he wanted to be of service to his audience, and if they would bear with him, and let him know what they wanted, he would do his best. Trying to fool people will just make you more nervous, so go ahead and level with them. "Remember that whatever you are talking about is not for your benefit...it is for the audience's benefit. If you concentrate on trying to give a 'perfect' performance, this puts a tremendous amount of pressure on you. If you look at audience members and mentally ask yourself what they need to hear from you, then you will do just fine. "If you forget what you were going to say next, just ask if anyone has a question. Somebody will probably ask you about the very thing you were going to cover next. "It is easy to know what to do: Whatever the audience responds favorably to, keep doing it, and do more of it. Trial and error is a great way to continue to get better and better. People can only sit still for a certain length of time; when they start getting up and leaving, it is time to take a break. "Study great presenters and entertainers. Notice how they get an audience involved, how they get people's attention, how they evoke emotion in audience members. Then, at your level, use what you observe them doing to help you build on your own strengths and unique talents to continue to get better and better. "Timing is your most valuable tool. What is timing? Timing is made up of pauses. Timing is not doing something at the right time, as most people think. Timing is not doing something...until the right time. Every successful professional wrestler knows that when you perform a great move - body slam your opponent or whatever - you have to strut around the ring for a few moments in order to give the audience time to absorb and appreciate what you just did. It might be good wrestling to do several things to your opponent and then try to pin him, but it's not good showmanship. Watch them yourself...when you see wrestlers perform several moves one right after the other in rapid succession, how much to you recall of what they did? It takes time...there must be pauses in order for people to absorb what you want them to absorb. Listen to singers, how they often sing lyrics after the musical beats, not on the beat. By the way, have you ever noticed that the most successful professional wrestlers may not be the most skillful wrestlers, but they are definitely the most creative? Art instructor Dord Fitz, who worked with a lot of Coach Bear Bryant's football players at the University of Alabama, and said that the best athletes were almost always very creative people. "Always remember to analyze your own performance at your level. Also analyze the performances of other people at your level, so that you can gain more insight into what they do and why they do it, and what effect their actions have on the audience. Then see what you can do to improve your own performance, and become even better and better.
Continue reading and see how Juan Silva used the Silva techniques to help him become a successful inventor on the next page: Creating an Inventor
Click for information and to buy Click for information and to buy Click for information and to buy Click for information and to buy Ed Bernd Jr. and Jose Silva with some of their books